Navigating Report 2021

Blockchain makes verifiable data for climate protection projects possible

Feb. 21, 2022

Preventing illegal logging, tracking energy production, and correctly allocating emissions under the polluter pays principle – all of this is possible with blockchain technology. The new Navigating Report 2021 from the Climate Ledger Initiative presents the results of climate-related pilot projects making use of blockchain and other innovative digital technologies.


The Wood Tracking Protocol provides a remedy: here, the wood processing chain is still being documented using pen and paper. (Foto: WTP)
The Wood Tracking Protocol provides a remedy: here, the wood processing chain is still being documented using pen and paper. (Foto: WTP)

The most recent UN Climate Conference, COP26 in Glasgow, demonstrated the need to implement specific measures and finally move from pledge to plan to performance. The Climate Ledger Initiative (CLI) is therefore supporting pilot projects in developing countries. Various technologies are being tested with a view to securing transparent, verifiable data from climate protection projects.

Wood Tracking Protocol WTP – blockchain to prevent illegal logging

80% of logging in Peru is illegal. Digital platforms, encrypted using blockchain, seek to ensure transparent, tamper-proof data along the supply and processing chains, and thus curb illegal logging activities. Legally felled logs are given a QR code. An app records where they are felled, shipped and processed. This provides information about origins and transport routes at the point of purchase, enabling customers to specifically opt for legally felled wood products.

Other pilot projects in Kenya, India and Chile

  • The FairClimateFund is supplying cookstoves to 100 households in India. Sensors analyse cooking practices and their impact on the climate.
  • Green Tracker Chile measures greenhouse gas emissions and resource savings from renewable energy generation, waste recycling and e-mobility.
  • Climate Risk Insurance in Kenya makes direct payments to 50,000 smallholders. These payments are triggered automatically by satellite weather data.
  • The OpenHAP team manufactures low-cost sensors locally in Kenya. They measure the effect of various cookstoves on indoor air quality in slum dwellings.

The FairClimateFund is providing 100 families with environmentally friendly cookstoves that use sensors to monitor air pollution levels. (Foto: FCF)
The FairClimateFund is providing 100 families with environmentally friendly cookstoves that use sensors to monitor air pollution levels. (Foto: FCF)

Subsequent findings

A lack of internet connections and limited use of smartphones both cause issues in many regions. Low-cost technologies are becoming increasingly important as they can be distributed cheaply and easily, enabling verifiable data to be obtained. Project manager Madeleine Guyer: «Collecting data by hand is inefficient, prone to error, and above all open to tampering. Blockchain is efficient and provides the political world with robust, transparent data as a basis for decision-making.» The report shows that cooperation with governments is vital in order to overcome local hurdles and facilitate access to digital platforms.

More information

Project team

Madeleine Guyer Senior Project Manager
Jürg Füssler Managing Partner
Anna Ehrler Consultant

Project

Navigating Blockchain for Climate Action

Duration

2019 - 2022

Topics


Services


Who we work for

Climate Ledger Initiative

Downloads


Contacts

Madeleine Guyer Senior Project Manager